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5 Questions Every Cleric Should Be Able to Answer

Last week we posted an article about 5 Questions Every Fighter Should Be Able to Answer. Well, we decided to make that into a series and share with you our thoughts on 5 Questions Every Cleric Should Be Able to Answer. Like last week, this series applies to any d20 fantasy-based game, such as Pathfinder, D&D 5e, 13th Age, or Swords and Wizardry.

Of the core four classes, clerics frequently get the least respect. In books and movies, they seldom have the spotlight. They can fight, but do not have the selection of weapons that a fighter possesses. They can cast spells but not as good as a wizard. In combat, they tend to have to drop what they are doing because the fighter has a boo-boo.

So why play one, other than the party needs a healer? Well, the role playing opportunities are excellent. The class itself is so full character and life that someone playing a cleric should just drink it up. To help you do this, here are 5 questions you should be able to answer when playing a cleric.

1) Why Did You Join This Church?

In all d20 fantasy games gods are as plentiful as puddles after a rain. So why did you join this church? Please note, this question is not, “Why did you join the clergy?” I’m just asking what got your foot in the door initially here. Was it because your parents are dead, and they took you in and raised you? Were you a merchant looking to make important business connections? Did you like the spectacle of their ritual sacrifices? Did a member of the church save you from an undead attack? Were you hedging your bets for the afterlife? Perhaps it was as pedestrian as, you grew up in a small town and it was the only religion in the area. All of these answers will help provide you with a solid foundation for your character.

2) What Made You Join the Clergy?

You could easily have been just a another member that listens to the cleric speak from time to time, made the occasional offering, and lived the rest of your life, but you didn’t. Why? Do you genuinely believe that the deity’s beliefs and methods are something you agree with, and you can see no other way for you to live your life? Do you have a need to tell everyone how much better their lives would be if they just did what your deity said. Were you in some kind of tragic accident/attack that killed everyone in your town/family/etc and the church is all you have left? Is it that you like to kill things, and this is one of the few socially acceptable ways of doing so in a civilized society. Do you crave the power to tell someone that follows the same faith as you what to do, and they do it, no matter what? How about this answer, its just a job. While we have trouble imagining that today, 500-1,000 years ago, being a priest was not a calling of faith but a way to provide a job to the fifth or eighth child of a land owner that didn’t want to split their territory. This is a defining moment in your character’s life, one that keeps you close to the deity’s power. This should not only color how you see the church but the world as well.

3) What Does Your Character Do To Have Fun?

Sure you can play a stereotypical cleric that loves singing the deity’s songs, reading the deity’s holy books, yet even real life clergy get tired of that from time to time. Heck, some even enjoy watching Family Guy. Not many, sure but still. They all have to kick back and relax. Not only that, some are naturally relaxed and can chill with no problem; others never seem to be comfortable having fun. Is your character socially awkward and makes noticeable but cute mistakes trying to fit in while drinking and playing cards? Are they an entertainer that missed their calling and are the life of the party by singing and juggling? Perhaps your character is more studious and is a voracious reader. This question adds a layer of complexity to the character and provides your character with more depth.

4) Where Do You And Your Deity Disagree?

The all to frequent answer to this is, “I don’t know. I never thought of that one before.” Before being asked that question, most players of clerics just substitute their deity’s beliefs for their own and call it a day. Remember, you are playing a person, not a bunch of talking points. Play someone with their own unique point of view. This can be technical, trivial point that no one outside the church’s clergy would care about or this can be as a serious fundamental point? Perhaps it is that you felt the deity should have acted to save someone from harm and the deity failed to do so. This sets up a conflict between the character and a major part of their life. If you want to explore this aspect, make sure you communicate this to your GM to build something with that in your game.

5) What Is Your Relationship To the Rest Of The Group?

Do you see your party as potential converts and are always telling them about why they should kneel before your god’s symbol? Do you see them as allies on a common mission. Are they just comrads in arms or are they friends? Like I said last time, you should definitely trust your party. However, that doesn’t mean that you cannot have a complex relationship with them.

Runa Cloudsoles is our signature dwarven cleric. Her clan worshipped Marduk and joining the clergy was her dream. She seldom had time for fun, working the cloud silver mines to help her family earn a living. Now that she lives on the ground, she is free to seek adventure. While Marduk believes justice should involve an eye for an eye, a tooth for a tooth, she shows mercy more often than others of her order would otherwise be. She sees her fellow adventurers as friends that work towards similar goals: justice, adventure and wealth. Runa, however, wants to use her wealth to talk to her family and find out if they want to live on the ground with her and make a safe and stable place for them. Read more about Runa here.

Want to give your cleric a celtic flare? Download Book of the Faithful: Celtic Subdomains for the Pathfinder RPG today.

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5e: Snapping Skulls Trap

For today’s weekly monster, we’re not showing off another monster but a trap. Traps are a apart of the tradition of D&D and, while different than monsters, should very much apart of D&D encounters. These help keep players on their toes and make a regular fight with monsters that much more dangerous if the floor beneath their feet opens up and you effectively lose one of your team for the combat.

Traps don’t have be as simple as a pit with spikes in the bottom. They can be as complex as some of the encounters in The Goonies. In truth, the kids in that movie encountered only traps, except for the three bad guys. Traps can be highly entertaining and downright fun when done right.

Today we are sharing with you a trap from the recently released Deadly Delves: Reign of Ruin adventure. We hope it finds a good home in your game.

Snapping Skulls Trap

Magic trap
This trap is activated when any non-dragon, non-lizardfolk, or non-kobold living being enters the northern hallway of Floor B. The skulls set in the walls of the hallway begin to chitter and snap, and their empty eye sockets glow with a sinister red light as they stretch forth from the cracked mortar to gnaw at passersby. Every round that a living being meeting the above criteria remains in the hall, they must succeed at a DC 15 Dexterity saving throw on initiative count 20 or take 11 (2d10) piercing damage and 11 (2d10) necrotic damage. (Note that because a successful save does not halve this damage, the Evasion feature does not affect the amount of damage dealt for any creatures who possess that ability).
A spell or other effect that can sense the presence of magic, such as detect magic, reveals an aura of necromancy emanating from the hallway.
The snapping skulls trap can only be disarmed by purifying the cursed fountain in the northeastern chamber of Area B2. A successful DC 18 Intelligence (Arcana or Religion) check is required to identify the ritual herbs needed to purify the fountain, which can be found in Area B3. Once the components have been identified and collected, completing the ritual takes 10 minutes, but requires no further checks to perform successfully.

Download Deadly Delves: Reign of Ruin at JonBrazer.com to get more traps for your Fifth Edition game.

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“Death” In The “Family”

You may have seen my post on social media that my computer died Monday. What exactly happened and what does it mean for JBE. First, what happened: the hard drive went. The boot sector is dead and nothing I do is bringing it back. “Have I tried …” My wife is a computer adept. She tried it. She was able to bring it back enough to copy any files that weren’t backed up online to a thumb drive. There’s still a few more things she wants to try, but what we lack is time to do them immediately, with Thanksgiving being this week and family obligations filling our weekends for the next few weeks. More than likely, I’ll be buying a new computer sooner rather than later.

What does this mean for JBE? Fortunately, there’s good news: my old computer works perfectly fine. It’s been sitting on my desk since I got the laptop and I’ve been wondering what I should do with it. Well, now I know: put it right back where it use to be. Sure, it has lots of updates to do, but beyond that there was nothing wrong with it. I just couldn’t play Skyrim on it. Oh well…

Next bit of good news: earlier this month, I decided to pay for online storage earlier this month and set up the computer so it would auto-backup anything in certain folders. So every file for JBE is saved, and when I left for the day job this morning, I was syncing it with my old computer. I even have the cover backed up that I was working on the night before the hard drive bit the dust. Grand total of files lost: zero.

That’s the good news. Any bad news? Well there will be two things lost: time (syncing, digging out activation numbers, working on an older system, computer shopping, trying to get the old one repaired) and money (new computer/repairing computer cost). How much, I don’t know yet. This much, I am sure about: I will not compromise the quality of our products because of this. If I tried to publish Deadly Delves: Nine Lives for Petane for Pathfinder RPG in December, it would be rushed and may not be up to our standards. Instead, I am delaying it until January 2018 and bringing 13 Fighter Talents and Maneuvers for the 13th Age Roleplaying Game up into December’s slot. The first in our 13 Class Options series is going to be significantly shorter and will require less time than a level 12 adventure. This should be completed before Christmas with the computer delays without compromising quality. I will admit, this is not how I wanted to show off the cover for it to you, but I hope you like it nonetheless.

As far as the rest of the schedule goes, I do not anticipate any issues, but I will keep you up to date should any such issues arise.

Have a happy holiday.

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Traveller: Zaspa T-68 Skyhopper

We’re doing a series right now of converting some of our vehicles from 1st edition Mongoose Traveller to 2nd edition. Last week, we looked at the Cyberpuma. Today we take a look at the Zaspa T-68 Skyhopper

Ideal for lower tech worlds, the T-68 Skyhopper features two main rotorblades to maximize stability and minimize the safe takeoff distance. The third rotorblade controls the vehicle’s pitch, and ultimately its forward speed. With more than a ton of cargo space, the skyhopper delivers the performance needed on a lightly-populated colony world at a price those same worlds can afford.

Zaspa T-68 Skyhopper

TL 6
Skill Flyer (rotor)
Agility +0
Speed (Cruise) Medium (Slow)
Range (Cruise) 1,000 (1,500)
Crew 1
Passengers 1
Cargo 1 ton
Hull 2
Shipping 5 tons
Cost Cr. 157,700

Armour

Front 2
Rear 2
Sides 2

Details

Autopilot (skill level)
Communications (range) 50 km
Navigation (Navigation DM) +1
Sensors (Electronics [Sensors] DM) +0, 1 km
Camouflage (Recon DM)
Stealth (Electronics [sensors] DM)

Traits/Equipment

Communications (Basic), Hostile Environment, Life Support (Short term), Navigation (Basic), Sensors (Basic)

Be sure to download Foreven Worlds: Ships of the Border Worlds for your Traveller game today at DriveThruRPG and RPGNow.

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PAX Unplugged: The Best Convention I’m Not Sure I Will Return To

This past weekend I was at PAX Unplugged, and I am glad I got to go. I got to play in my very first Call of Cthulhu game. I had fun with a new character in D&D. I met a gamer I had previously only interacted with online. I even met a fellow Captain Hammer. They even had a diversity lounge with some really cool people. And of course, I snagged some awesome stuff in the dealer’s hall. It was really great.

https://www.facebook.com/ThatJayJustice/

Will I be back next year? I don’t know. Why? Short answer: poor organization. I was there most of Friday (arriving around 1 pm instead of the 10am open), and I didn’t get to play in a single game. Zero. None. And it wasn’t for lack of trying. I checked in at the D&D AL desk and they were full for the next 6 hours. Other games, no open spots on the wait list. I stood in a few lines to get any game I could only to have the available games fill up before I got to the front.

Why didn’t I sign up online beforehand? There wasn’t any. No, I’m not kidding. They did not do any kind of official online preregistration before the convention started. Need proof to believe me?

That is the “queue room” 20 minutes before we we’re allowed to sign up for role playing games Saturday morning. Note, this doesn’t include minis gamers or board gamers. I got in that line 2 hours beforehand, and I was not the first. I got into three games that day. Considering the number of games available, most of the people in that room didn’t get to sign up for games in advance.

This brings me to my second complaint: there just weren’t enough games. When I asked an “enforcer” (their name for one of the super polite staffers and/or volunteers), they said they underestimated the popularity of the games. There really needed to be double the space for RPGs. I can’t speak to board gamers or minis gamers as to whether they had enough space for their games since I didn’t check them out all weekend.

At the end of the day, these are rookie mistakes, and they can certainly be forgiven even if one could have simply Googled “how to run a tabletop convention” and get solutions to these issues. The Pathfinder/Starfinder Society crew saw PAX Unplugged’s setup and decided to use Warhorn on their own to schedule their games; I did not hear of similar issues from them. The Google link above has Tabletop.Events on it’s first page. Both of these services allow for people to sign up for games beforehand and would have solved the above mentioned issues. They both do their job extremely well, and I cannot recommend them enough to anyone running a convention, no matter what size. Had they used either of these (or one of their own creation), they could have discovered how popular RPGs (and other types of games) was going to be and shift resources accordingly.

Will I be back? Not unless these have some type of online pre-registration for events. Waking up before I normally wake up for the day job to get in a 2 hour line is not exactly my definition of fun. If they do get some kind of pre-reg system in place, will I then? In a heartbeat. I got to see lots new games and familiar faces, roll dice and slay monsters, and it was 11 hours closer to me than GenCon. I just don’t want to have to wait in 2+ hour lines for a game again, not when I can just click a few buttons and have a guaranteed spot.

Final thought: I want to give a shout out to the enforcers. They we’re kind and patient and did EVERYTHING they could to help upset gamers. They made things run as smooth as they could with what they had to work with. Every last one if them deserves a round of applause. Thank you for your part in making the convention as great as it was.

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5 Questions Every Fighter Should Be Able To Answer

It doesn’t matter which fantasy game you play: Pathfinder, D&D of any edition, 13th Age, Swords and Wizardry, or any other variation on the game, they all have someone that is easy to for a new person to play that generally involves swinging a sword. Some move onto more complex classes; others stay with their tried and true favorite. No matter how long you have been playing the classic fighter class. Just because the mechanics are not terribly complex does not mean that role playing such a character should be stunted. Fighters can be just as involved and complex characters as any other on the board. To help you get into your character and see the world through their eyes, here are five simple questions that can help you immerse yourself into your character even more.

1) Why Did You Start Fighting?

You didn’t pick up the sword yesterday. You have trained for this. You fought against something and you emerged victorious. What was it? Why did you fight? Did you grow up on the family farm and a spider the size of a dog start spitting its venom at your family nearby and you attacked it with your garden hoe? Did the king conscript you into some battle and you happened to survive? Where you sold into slavery and thrown into a pit with another slave and were told to kill the other before the other slave killed you while the crowd took bets on who survived? No matter how you answer that question it will provide you with a solid foundation for your character.

2) Why Do You Fight Now?

Sure, fighting may not have been your choice before, but why do you do it now? You could be sitting in a tavern drinking, in a mine swinging a pick axe, a local guard, someone in the regular military, someone that loads the cargo docks, or one of a hundred other jobs that will probably see you having a longer life expectancy than walking into a dark cave looking for trouble. Are you on the run from someone more powerful? Perhaps you are trying to avenge the death of someone you held dear. Maybe you already killed the person that murdered your loved one and are now just trying to earn enough money to have the dead person resurrected. Did you return home from the war having seen so much that no one you love wants to be around you anymore? Have you been fighting for so long that you no longer know who you are until you are wearing the armor and swinging your weapon? This will help you find out who this character is on a day to day basis.

3) When Will You Not Fight?

“When all you have is a hammer, everything looks like the nail,” is an apt expression for the fighter. “Something is coming!” “I STAB IT!” Fighters are frequently accursed of being from the “Stab first, ask questions never,” school of thinking. But even they will sheath their swords if the right thing is put in front of them. The question is, what is it for your character. Is it an old war buddy that had your back? An old commander, mentor, teacher, or family member that helped you become what you are today? Perhaps it is a wounded bunny rabbit, even if it is sitting on top of a suspicious-looking tree stump with what could be a weird grin on its front? How about instead of it being something that obvious, you will stay your hand for something less expected, like when a member of a religious order appears, even if you do not appear religious at any other time. Perhaps you will not fight on the anniversary of your parent’s death, and you just won’t tell anyone why you are spending the day in a bar. This question is important because it introduces a source of internal conflict in your character, helping them go from an idea to a person.

4) What Are You Afraid Of?

Everyone is afraid of something. Some won’t admit it, but even they are. Are you a sensible person and are afraid of spiders? Did you see your dead buddies on a battle field being raised before your eyes and now have a terrifying fear of dead bodies just lying around? Is the sound of war drums or the way the ground shakes when cavalry is charging right at you? Is it the musty odor of a dungeon or the putrid smell of rotting corpses? Even worse, is the screams you hear every night as you try to fall asleep that can only be quieted by massive amounts of alcohol? Like the last question, having a fear is a source of internal conflict that provides depth to the character, but it also gives the person a way to grow. By standing up the fears, you can make a character that fights not only the demons on the battlefield but also the demons raging inside.

5) Why Do You Trust The Rest Of The Party?

Please note, I didn’t ask “do you trust the rest of the party?” The answer to that question must be a resounding “Yes.” As someone that has played his fair share of games that involved the rest of the party not trusting each other, it can go bad. Like ending friendships bad. Yes, I am speaking from experience on this. Many campaigns start with the group coming together and that is fine, but after a while you all need to have a talk where everyone finds reasons to trust each other beyond “they fought beside me.” Consider having a session where everyone stays in character the whole time around the fire and everyone gets to know the other characters. You’d be amazed at just how bonding that can be to a group.

What Other Questions Should A Fighter Be Able to Answer? Leave Your thoughts in the comments below.

Darlanrea, the elven fighter, is featured on the cover of our adventure Deadly Delves: Reign of Ruin. Download this adventure today for Fifth Edition, Pathfinder RPG, 13th Age, and Swords and Wizardry.

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Traveller: Giant Ants

Every Wednesday, we have a new monster here at JonBrazer.com, and we are making sure that at least one of these creatures every month is for the Traveller Roleplaying Game. Last month we had the paskrin, a creature that chews on the power cables of a ship, which everyone just LOVES!!!! Today we are taking a look at giant ants.

So many times in science fiction, we encounter creatures that are familiar and either harmless or mostly harmless that are scaled up to gigantic sizes. Suddenly those harmless creatures are anything but and it is your job to deal with them. One that just about everyone has seen before is a giant ant. Today we stat it up for you.

So exactly how big and dangerous is this this thing? With a trait of Large (+5), it is larger than an elephant but smaller than the largest whales. Think of a dinosaur. Come to think of it, these stats would be great for a dinosaur as well since it has an exoskeleton similar to those great lizards’ thick hide. So yea, building (and ship) damage is hardly out of the question for these creatures. With a nice radiation contamination, an entire colony of these gigantic creatures insects could make short work of a city, no matter what tech level.

Animal Hits Speed
Giant Ant 110 9 m
Skills Athletics (strength) 4, Melee (bite) 3, Recon 1, Survival 2
Attacks Bite (6D)
Traits Armour (+3), Large (+5)
Behaviour Omnivore, Eater

If you want more creatures in your Traveller game, download Prelude to War: State of Chaos at DriveThruRPG or RPGNow today. This adventure has 10 new creatures ready to be used in your game.

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Traveller: Cyberpuma, A 4-Person Gravcar

Today sees the start of a new series. We are updating the vehicles we created for 1e Mongoose Traveller to the Second Edition. These are here for your use in your games and we hope you enjoy them.

Today we are starting with the Cyberpuma from the Massinagrav corporation. Compared to today cars, this would be a sports car. Sure, it fits four people, but those in the back are going to be a bit squished. That, however is well worth the acceleration and agility on this thing. Massinagrav, as you may guess is firmly in Zhodani space. Yet the corporation is owned by a Solomani. The planet was incorporated into the Consulate generations ago and the people there are full Zhodani citizens, even if they are not Zhodani by heritage.

Massinagrav Cyberpuma

TL 12
Skill Flyer (grav)
Agility +5
Speed (Cruise) Very Fast (Fast)
Range (Cruise) 3,000 (4,500)
Crew 1
Passengers 3
Cargo 1 ton
Hull 12
Shipping 3 tons
Cost Cr. 425,450

Armour

Front 4
Rear 4
Sides 4

Details

Autopilot (skill level) 3
Communications (range) 1000 km
Navigation (Navigation DM) +2
Sensors (Electronics [Sensors] DM) +1, 5 km
Camouflage (Recon DM)
Stealth (Electronics [sensors] DM)

Traits/Equipment

Advanced Autopilot, Advanced Control System, Communication System, Entertainment System (Basic), Improved Navigation, Improved Sensors, Streamlined
Entertainment System: Increase to Entertainment System (Improved) for an additional Cr. 550.

Be sure to download Foreven Worlds: Ships of the Border Worlds for your Traveller game today exclusively at DriveThruRPG and RPGNow.

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Pathfinder: Summon Monster IX Unchained

Today we made it to the end of the this series. I hope you enjoyed it thus far. If this is the first in the Summon Monster Unchained series, please check out I, II, III, IV, V, VI, VII, and VIII.

This is the pinnacle, the highest level summon monster spell there is. What you summon here should be freaking awesome. This should demonstrate you prowess and power as a spellcaster. You should be summoning creatures that not only are perfect for the situation but also make you look cook at the same time. This spell is as powerful as miracle and wish. Only the most elite and dedicated spellcasters make it this far and this list of creatures should be suitably impressive.

So how many creatures can a good caster summon with the base list? Three. Yea, that’s why this is necessary. That is why we have been doing this.

Table 9: Summon Monster IX

9th Level Subtype
Astral Deva (angel) Good
Ghaele azata Chaotic, Good
Glabrezu (demon) Chaotic, Evil
Ice devil Evil, Lawful
Nalfeshnee (demon) Chaotic, Evil
Trumpet archon Good, Lawful
Pathfinder Roleplaying Game: Bestiary 2
Thanadaemon (daemon) Evil
Handmaiden devil (gylou) Evil, Lawful
Augnagar (qlippoth) Chaotic, Evil
Giant white whale*
Pathfinder Roleplaying Game: Bestiary 3
Shipwrecker crab*
Tarry demodand Chaotic, Evil
Sepid (div) Evil
Pathfinder Roleplaying Game: Bestiary 4
Morrigna (psychopomp)
Pathfinder Roleplaying Game: Bestiary 5
Rishi Manu (manasaputra) Good, Lawful
Bestiary 6
Temerdaemon (daemon) Evil
Oolioddroo (demon) Chaotic, Evil
Giganotosaurus (dinosaur)*
Titanoboa (megafauna)*
Oshageros (protean) Chaotic
Behimiron (qlippoth) Chaotic, Evil

Thank you for joining us as we did this series. Help us to do more Pathfinder articles like this by download Deadly Delves: The Gilded Gauntlet today from the Jon Brazer Enterprises Shop.

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Pathfinder: Goblin-O’-Wisp

Varying up a monster is a great way of keeping your players on their toes. By giving them something they don’t expect, they are not sure what else is changed. It will give them a moment’s pause.

When you change a monster, pick a theme. Let that theme guide you in varying that monster. Take the will-o’-wisp as an example. Vary that up with a goblin theme so your first change should be to change the damage type to fire instead of electricity. Then the next part you should change is their description and their behavior to be more in line with a goblin. This will allow you to put your own stamp on your game.

​Goblin-O’-Wisp

(Based on a will-o’-wisp)

This faintly glowing ball of red and orange light bobs gently in the air, the nebulous image of a goblin’s skull is visible somewhere in its depths.

Goblin-O’-Wisp CR 6

XP 2,400
CE Small aberration (fire)
Init +14; Senses darkvision 60 ft.; Perception +17


Defense


AC 27, touch 27, flat-footed 16 (+5 deflection, +10 Dex, +1 dodge, +1 size)
hp 40 (9d8)
Fort +3, Ref +13, Will +9
Defensive Abilities natural invisibility; Immune magic


Offense


Speed fly 50 ft. (perfect)
Melee incinerate +17 touch (2d8 fire/18-20)
Statistics
Str 1, Dex 31, Con 10, Int 15, Wis 16, Cha 14
Base Atk +6; CMB +0; CMD 25 (cannot be tripped)
Feats Alertness, Blind-Fight, Dodge, Improved Initiative, Weapon Finesse
Skills Acrobatics +21, Bluff +11, Escape Artist +21, Fly +31, Perception +17, Stealth +25
Languages Aklo, Common
SQ feed on fear
Ecology
Environment any swamp
Organization solitary, pair or string (3-4)
Treasure incidental
Special Abilities
Feed on Fear (Su) Anytime a goblin-o’-wisp is within 15 feet of a dying creature or creature subject to a fear effect, it gains fast healing 5.
Immune to Magic (Ex) Goblin-o’-wisps are immune to all spells and spell-like abilities that allow spell resistance, except magic missile and maze.
Natural Invisibility (Ex) Goblin-o’-wisps have the ability to extinguish their natural glow as a move action, effectively becoming invisible, as per the spell.

Find ways to vary up more monsters with the Book of Beasts: Varied Monsters at JonBrazer.com.

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Foreven Worlds: Ships of the Border Worlds

Be a Leaf on the Wind

Travelling the stars requires a ship to take you there. When you travel beyond the edge of the Zhodani Consulate or the Third Imperium, you will need a ship designed for these pirate-ridden areas. Choose and launch your craft today!

This volume of Foreven Worlds details the Ships of the Border Worlds and includes:

  • Details on five new ships, ranging from the 100-ton Malforge Light Cargo Transport to the 700 Zhodani Frontier-Class Merchant Vessel
  • Beautiful top-down layouts for each deck of every ship
  • Descriptions of the ships and the worlds they come from
  • Plenty of ideas for you to incorporate these ships into your adventures

Set your Travellers on a New Adventure!

Download Foreven Worlds: Ships of the Border Worlds today exclusively at DriveThruRPG and RPGNow.

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Traveller: Your Ship Says A Lot About You

The ship you fly says quite a bit about the person flying her in the same way that you can tell quite a bit about someone by what kind of car they drive. In the same way you don’t find many young wealthy entrepreneurs driving minivans, you’re not going to find military attack vessels with a large cargo hold.

So if you and your gaming group are flying around in the new MDC-41—also known as the Malforge Defense Craft—you’re not going to be your standard group of cargo haulers. This 100-ton ship has exactly 1 ton of cargo space inside. Unlike the civilian variant of this ship, the Malforge Light Cargo Ship (MLCS-783) which has a full 30 tons devoted to cargo. Even though these two ships are identical from the outside (except for the paint job), these two ships are quite different. The attack ship is optimized to jump into a system, conduct its mission and jump back out again, all without refueling. It features a triple beam turret to take on ships that comes its way. While the civilian variant can … deliver cargo. Sure the civilian ship still has the armored bulkheads for the power plant, gravity drive and fuel tanks, and both ships use identical software, allowing the ships to operate with less crew that would otherwise be required. However, it is the way these ships use their space that makes them appeal to very different audiences. So what does choosing the MDC-41 Malforge Defense Craft say about someone that chooses it over the MLCS-783 Malforge Light Cargo Ship? Crews flying the defense craft are looking for action, both in space and on the ground. If you are in the Light Cargo Ship, you are looking for a regular steady job, even if problems keep finding you.

Now lets compare the MDC-41 to the Bromley Mercenary Hauler (CJ-875). The Bromley may have ten staterooms to the Malforge’s three. The Malforge Defense Craft may have a single turret sporting three beam lasers, the CJ-875 features six turrets, each with a pair of armor piercing pulse lasers, owing to the fact that the latter is six times the size of the Malforge ship. That difference in size gives it room to have a 263 ton cargo hold, giving the Bromley the ability to carry vehicles and transport precious cargo. However, the Bromley requires eleven people to be fully operational while the Malforge only requires three, and that is before the Malforge craft’s virtual crew software handles a position. Plus the Bromley costs more than four times the price of the Malforge. So what does choosing the MDC-41 Malforge Defense Craft say about someone that chooses it over the Bromley? Crews flying the Malforge have a smaller crew, more economical crew and can handle more personal stories. Alternatively crews that fly the Bromley are going to be taking on groups of guerilla rebels and pirate outfits.

These three ships described here are featured in the Foreven Worlds: Ships of the Border Worlds. Download this awesome book today exclusively at DriveThruRPG and RPGNow.