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5 Questions Every Cleric Should Be Able to Answer

Last week we posted an article about 5 Questions Every Fighter Should Be Able to Answer. Well, we decided to make that into a series and share with you our thoughts on 5 Questions Every Cleric Should Be Able to Answer. Like last week, this series applies to any d20 fantasy-based game, such as Pathfinder, D&D 5e, 13th Age, or Swords and Wizardry.

Of the core four classes, clerics frequently get the least respect. In books and movies, they seldom have the spotlight. They can fight, but do not have the selection of weapons that a fighter possesses. They can cast spells but not as good as a wizard. In combat, they tend to have to drop what they are doing because the fighter has a boo-boo.

So why play one, other than the party needs a healer? Well, the role playing opportunities are excellent. The class itself is so full character and life that someone playing a cleric should just drink it up. To help you do this, here are 5 questions you should be able to answer when playing a cleric.

1) Why Did You Join This Church?

In all d20 fantasy games gods are as plentiful as puddles after a rain. So why did you join this church? Please note, this question is not, “Why did you join the clergy?” I’m just asking what got your foot in the door initially here. Was it because your parents are dead, and they took you in and raised you? Were you a merchant looking to make important business connections? Did you like the spectacle of their ritual sacrifices? Did a member of the church save you from an undead attack? Were you hedging your bets for the afterlife? Perhaps it was as pedestrian as, you grew up in a small town and it was the only religion in the area. All of these answers will help provide you with a solid foundation for your character.

2) What Made You Join the Clergy?

You could easily have been just a another member that listens to the cleric speak from time to time, made the occasional offering, and lived the rest of your life, but you didn’t. Why? Do you genuinely believe that the deity’s beliefs and methods are something you agree with, and you can see no other way for you to live your life? Do you have a need to tell everyone how much better their lives would be if they just did what your deity said. Were you in some kind of tragic accident/attack that killed everyone in your town/family/etc and the church is all you have left? Is it that you like to kill things, and this is one of the few socially acceptable ways of doing so in a civilized society. Do you crave the power to tell someone that follows the same faith as you what to do, and they do it, no matter what? How about this answer, its just a job. While we have trouble imagining that today, 500-1,000 years ago, being a priest was not a calling of faith but a way to provide a job to the fifth or eighth child of a land owner that didn’t want to split their territory. This is a defining moment in your character’s life, one that keeps you close to the deity’s power. This should not only color how you see the church but the world as well.

3) What Does Your Character Do To Have Fun?

Sure you can play a stereotypical cleric that loves singing the deity’s songs, reading the deity’s holy books, yet even real life clergy get tired of that from time to time. Heck, some even enjoy watching Family Guy. Not many, sure but still. They all have to kick back and relax. Not only that, some are naturally relaxed and can chill with no problem; others never seem to be comfortable having fun. Is your character socially awkward and makes noticeable but cute mistakes trying to fit in while drinking and playing cards? Are they an entertainer that missed their calling and are the life of the party by singing and juggling? Perhaps your character is more studious and is a voracious reader. This question adds a layer of complexity to the character and provides your character with more depth.

4) Where Do You And Your Deity Disagree?

The all to frequent answer to this is, “I don’t know. I never thought of that one before.” Before being asked that question, most players of clerics just substitute their deity’s beliefs for their own and call it a day. Remember, you are playing a person, not a bunch of talking points. Play someone with their own unique point of view. This can be technical, trivial point that no one outside the church’s clergy would care about or this can be as a serious fundamental point? Perhaps it is that you felt the deity should have acted to save someone from harm and the deity failed to do so. This sets up a conflict between the character and a major part of their life. If you want to explore this aspect, make sure you communicate this to your GM to build something with that in your game.

5) What Is Your Relationship To the Rest Of The Group?

Do you see your party as potential converts and are always telling them about why they should kneel before your god’s symbol? Do you see them as allies on a common mission. Are they just comrads in arms or are they friends? Like I said last time, you should definitely trust your party. However, that doesn’t mean that you cannot have a complex relationship with them.

Runa Cloudsoles is our signature dwarven cleric. Her clan worshipped Marduk and joining the clergy was her dream. She seldom had time for fun, working the cloud silver mines to help her family earn a living. Now that she lives on the ground, she is free to seek adventure. While Marduk believes justice should involve an eye for an eye, a tooth for a tooth, she shows mercy more often than others of her order would otherwise be. She sees her fellow adventurers as friends that work towards similar goals: justice, adventure and wealth. Runa, however, wants to use her wealth to talk to her family and find out if they want to live on the ground with her and make a safe and stable place for them. Read more about Runa here.

Want to give your cleric a celtic flare? Download Book of the Faithful: Celtic Subdomains for the Pathfinder RPG today.

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5 Questions Every Fighter Should Be Able To Answer

It doesn’t matter which fantasy game you play: Pathfinder, D&D of any edition, 13th Age, Swords and Wizardry, or any other variation on the game, they all have someone that is easy to for a new person to play that generally involves swinging a sword. Some move onto more complex classes; others stay with their tried and true favorite. No matter how long you have been playing the classic fighter class. Just because the mechanics are not terribly complex does not mean that role playing such a character should be stunted. Fighters can be just as involved and complex characters as any other on the board. To help you get into your character and see the world through their eyes, here are five simple questions that can help you immerse yourself into your character even more.

1) Why Did You Start Fighting?

You didn’t pick up the sword yesterday. You have trained for this. You fought against something and you emerged victorious. What was it? Why did you fight? Did you grow up on the family farm and a spider the size of a dog start spitting its venom at your family nearby and you attacked it with your garden hoe? Did the king conscript you into some battle and you happened to survive? Where you sold into slavery and thrown into a pit with another slave and were told to kill the other before the other slave killed you while the crowd took bets on who survived? No matter how you answer that question it will provide you with a solid foundation for your character.

2) Why Do You Fight Now?

Sure, fighting may not have been your choice before, but why do you do it now? You could be sitting in a tavern drinking, in a mine swinging a pick axe, a local guard, someone in the regular military, someone that loads the cargo docks, or one of a hundred other jobs that will probably see you having a longer life expectancy than walking into a dark cave looking for trouble. Are you on the run from someone more powerful? Perhaps you are trying to avenge the death of someone you held dear. Maybe you already killed the person that murdered your loved one and are now just trying to earn enough money to have the dead person resurrected. Did you return home from the war having seen so much that no one you love wants to be around you anymore? Have you been fighting for so long that you no longer know who you are until you are wearing the armor and swinging your weapon? This will help you find out who this character is on a day to day basis.

3) When Will You Not Fight?

“When all you have is a hammer, everything looks like the nail,” is an apt expression for the fighter. “Something is coming!” “I STAB IT!” Fighters are frequently accursed of being from the “Stab first, ask questions never,” school of thinking. But even they will sheath their swords if the right thing is put in front of them. The question is, what is it for your character. Is it an old war buddy that had your back? An old commander, mentor, teacher, or family member that helped you become what you are today? Perhaps it is a wounded bunny rabbit, even if it is sitting on top of a suspicious-looking tree stump with what could be a weird grin on its front? How about instead of it being something that obvious, you will stay your hand for something less expected, like when a member of a religious order appears, even if you do not appear religious at any other time. Perhaps you will not fight on the anniversary of your parent’s death, and you just won’t tell anyone why you are spending the day in a bar. This question is important because it introduces a source of internal conflict in your character, helping them go from an idea to a person.

4) What Are You Afraid Of?

Everyone is afraid of something. Some won’t admit it, but even they are. Are you a sensible person and are afraid of spiders? Did you see your dead buddies on a battle field being raised before your eyes and now have a terrifying fear of dead bodies just lying around? Is the sound of war drums or the way the ground shakes when cavalry is charging right at you? Is it the musty odor of a dungeon or the putrid smell of rotting corpses? Even worse, is the screams you hear every night as you try to fall asleep that can only be quieted by massive amounts of alcohol? Like the last question, having a fear is a source of internal conflict that provides depth to the character, but it also gives the person a way to grow. By standing up the fears, you can make a character that fights not only the demons on the battlefield but also the demons raging inside.

5) Why Do You Trust The Rest Of The Party?

Please note, I didn’t ask “do you trust the rest of the party?” The answer to that question must be a resounding “Yes.” As someone that has played his fair share of games that involved the rest of the party not trusting each other, it can go bad. Like ending friendships bad. Yes, I am speaking from experience on this. Many campaigns start with the group coming together and that is fine, but after a while you all need to have a talk where everyone finds reasons to trust each other beyond “they fought beside me.” Consider having a session where everyone stays in character the whole time around the fire and everyone gets to know the other characters. You’d be amazed at just how bonding that can be to a group.

What Other Questions Should A Fighter Be Able to Answer? Leave Your thoughts in the comments below.

Darlanrea, the elven fighter, is featured on the cover of our adventure Deadly Delves: Reign of Ruin. Download this adventure today for Fifth Edition, Pathfinder RPG, 13th Age, and Swords and Wizardry.

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5e: Conjure Fey

Book of Heroic Races: Player Races 1 (5e)

Today we come to the final conjure spell. Previously, we discussed conjure animals, conjure celestial, conjure minor elementals, conjure woodland beings, and conjure elemental. As always, let’s read the spell’s text:

Conjure Fey

6th-level conjuration

Casting Time: 1 minute
Range: 90 feet
Components: V, S
Duration: Concentration, up to 1 hour

You summon a fey creature of challenge rating 6 or lower, or a fey spirit that takes the form of a beast of challenge rating 6 or lower. It appears in an unoccupied space that you can see within range. The fey creature disappears when it drops to 0 hit points or when the spell ends.

The fey creature is friendly to you and your companions for the duration. Roll initiative for the creature, which has its own turns. It obeys any verbal commands that you issue to it (no action required by you), as long as they don’t violate its alignment. If you don’t issue any commands to the fey creature, it defends itself from hostile creatures but otherwise takes no actions.

If your concentration is broken, the fey creature doesn’t disappear. Instead, you lose control of the fey creature, it becomes hostile toward you and your companions, and it might attack. An uncontrolled fey creature can’t be dismissed by you, and it disappears 1 hour after you summoned it.

The GM has the fey creature’s statistics.

At Higher Levels: When you cast this spell using a spell slot of 7th level or higher, the challenge rating increases by 1 for each slot level above 6th.

This spell is quite similar to conjure elemental except it requires a higher level to cast, but it also brings a higher level creature to the table. In fact, it brings a of equal CR to one you could call upon with the conjure elemental spell if cast at the same level. This stands in sharp contrast with conjure celestial in that it uses a high spell slot that this spell requires but conjures a lower level creature.

Enough analysis of the spell itself, how about the creatures that can be summoned? Well, everything that you can bring to the table with conjure woodland beings as well as conjure animals plus:

6th-level: Ankylosaurus (dinosaur), triceratops (dinosaur), green hag, night hag, giant crocodile, giant scorpion, giant shark, killer whale, mammoth
7th-level: Giant ape
8th-level: Tyrannosaurus rex (dinosaur)
9th-level: —

I will admit that when I was preparing the list of conjurable creatures for this list, I missed that it allowed beasts as well. So my original list of creatures was just the green hag and the night hag. I couldn’t believe that the list was this short so I went back and read it again and discovered that it allowed beasts as well. That different saved the spell. It goes from 2 summomable creatures to 11. Just like conjure elemental, you do not have any creatures you can summon using a 9th-level spell slot, but at least your hero has 7th- and 8th-level options with this spell.

Speaking of your hero, choose an exciting races for your character today. Download the Book of Heroic Races: Player Races 1 at the JonBrazer Shop now.

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5e: Conjure Elemental

Today we come to what I consider to be the main conjuring spell: conjure elemental. Previously we covered conjure animals, conjure celestial, conjure minor elementals, and conjure woodland beings.

Conjure Elemental

5th-level conjuration

Casting Time: 1 minute
Range: 90 feet
Components: V, S, M (burning incense for air, soft clay for earth, sulfur and phosphorus for fire, or water and sand for water)
Duration: Concentration, up to 1 hour

You call forth an elemental servant. Choose an area of air, earth, fire, or water that fills a 10-foot cube within range. An elemental of challenge rating 5 or lower appropriate to the area you chose appears in an unoccupied space within 10 feet of it. For example, a fire elemental emerges from a bonfire, and an earth elemental rises up from the ground.

The elemental disappears when it drops to 0 hit points or when the spell ends.

The elemental is friendly to you and your companions for the duration. Roll initiative for the elemental, which has its own turns. It obeys any verbal commands that you issue to it (no action required by you). If you don’t issue any commands to the elemental, it defends itself from hostile creatures but otherwise takes no actions.

If your concentration is broken, the elemental doesn’t disappear. Instead, you lose control of the elemental, it becomes hostile toward you and your companions, and it might attack. An uncontrolled elemental can’t be dismissed by you, and it disappears 1 hour after you summoned it.

The GM has the elemental’s statistics.

At Higher Levels: When you cast this spell using a spell slot of 6th level or higher, the challenge rating increases by 1 for each slot level above 5th.

Like conjure celestial, conjure elemental brings one creature to your side. The list of creatures you can conjure includes everything you can summon with conjure minor elementals plus:

5th-level: Air elemental, earth elemental, fire elemental, water elemental, salamander, water weird, xorn
6th-level: Galeb duhr, invisible stalker
7th-level: —
8th-level: —
9th-level: —

As you can see, there are no creatures above 6th level that you can bring to the table, making this a useless spell above 6th level. At one level, I can understand such few options this because of how few 7th-, 8th-, and 9th-level spells casters receive. Having said that, they should still have at least some options. We will be working on that in the future. Have no fear.

We’ve got four new variations on the normal elementals in the MM that you can conjure with this spell in the newly released Deadly Delves: Reign of Ruin. Download this 7th- or 8th-level adventure today for your Fifth Edition game from JonBrazer.com today.

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5e: Prepare for the Reign Of Ruin

Beware The Blackener Of Bright Waters, For She Is Come Again

Rumors of death move like a plague through the Crannogtowns of the Great Swamp—of ranger patrols mysteriously disappearing on routine scouting missions, of a winged shadow that blots out the midday sun, and of entire villages slaughtered, their homes left burning and the victims’ flesh melted from their bones. All evidence gathered from the sites of these massacres points to the heart of the Great Swamp, where an ancient and primitive tribe of lizardmen have ruled from an abandoned human temple for centuries on end. The Crannogtowns’ protectors, the Stormhammer Rangers, warn that horrid half-dragon monstrosities still stalk the bogs and travelers would do well to stay away from the inner swamp. Yet the killing and the carnage continue, and the people of the Crannogs plead for heroes to aid them now as they did in days long forgotten. Are you up to the challenge?

Reign Of Ruin is the exciting new adventure module in Jon Brazer Enterprises’ Deadly Delves product line, and is designed for the Fifth Edition of the World’s Oldest Fantasy Roleplaying Game. This adventure is designed to heartily challenge a party of 7th- or 8th-level PCs and leave them with a memorable heroic tale. Inside this volume, you’ll find:

  • 18 New or Modified Monsters and NPCs for your campaign, including lizardfolk warpriests, swarms of undead, and a black dragon fighter
  • 9 New Traps to menace the PCs, including retractable stair spikes, acid bath chambers, and statues that spray corrosive fluid
  • 3 New Magic Items waiting to be discovered, including the glorious rainbow sceptre.
  • Full-color maps of a Crannogtown village, as well as five floors of a terrifying temple dungeon
  • Specialized advice on playing a cunning black dragon against a group of PCs in a dangerous game of cat and mouse
  • Enough content for five 7th- or 8th-level PCs to gain nearly two levels, with ideas to extend the story even further once you’re done exploring the temple

Dangers Unknown. Treasures Untold. Adventure Awaits.

Download Deadly Delves: Reign Of Ruin today at the JonBrazer Shop. You can also find this adventure at DriveThruRPG/RPGNow, the Open Gaming Store, and Paizo.com.

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5e: Conjure Woodland Beings

Deadly Delves: Doom of the Sky Sword (5e)

Now that we’ve covered the lowest level conjuring spells for the three classes that can summon assistance. First we covered conjure animals. Then we skipped to the highest level conjure spell: conjure celestial. Last week we talked conjure elemental. Today we talk the next logical step up from conjure animals: conjure woodland beings. First let’s take a look at the spell itself.

Conjure Woodland Beings

4th-level conjuration
Casting Time: 1 action
Range: 60 feet
Components: V, S, M (one holly berry per creature summoned)
Duration: Concentration, up to 1 hour

You summon fey creatures that appear in unoccupied spaces that you can see within range. Choose one of the following options for what appears:

  • One fey creature of challenge rating 2 or lower
  • Two fey creatures of challenge rating 1 or lower
  • Four fey creatures of challenge rating 1/2 or lower
  • Eight fey creatures of challenge rating 1/4 or lower

A summoned creature disappears when it drops to 0 hit points or when the spell ends.

The summoned creatures are friendly to you and your companions. Roll initiative for the summoned creatures as a group, which have their own turns. They obey any verbal commands that you issue to them (no action required by you). If you don’t issue any commands to them, they defend themselves from hostile creatures, but otherwise take no actions. The GM has the creatures’ statistics.

At Higher Levels: When you cast this spell using certain higher-level spell slots, you choose one of the summoning options above, and more creatures appear: twice as many with a 6th-level slot and three times as many with an 8th-level slot.

So what precisely can you conjure with this spell? Well, from the MM, you can summon:
CR 2: Sea hag
CR 1: Dryad
CR 1/2: Pixie, satyr
CR 1/4: Sprite, blink dog

Like conjure celestial, the list of creatures to magically bring to the table is remarkably thin. Even then, a sea hag is going to not be a desirable creature to be summoned many players, it being chaotic evil.

That means that this spell has much needed room for expansion as far as creatures to conjure. Be sure to come back to JonBrazer.com every Wednesday for new monsters, some you can conjure with spells like conjure woodland beings or the other spells we are covering in this series. Support our efforts to cover spells like this and other exciting articles by downloading Deadly Delves: Doom of the Sky Sword for your Fifth Edition game today at JonBrazer.com.

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5e: Conjure Minor Elementals

Deadly Delves: Along Came a Spider (5e)

Today we come to the third major group of conjuring creatures to your side: conjuring elementals. If you haven’t read conjure animals and conjure celestial, be sure to check them out.

Conjure Minor Elementals

4th-level conjuration
Casting Time: 1 minute
Range: 90 feet
Components: V, S
Duration: Concentration, up to 1 hour
You summon elementals that appear in unoccupied spaces that you can see within range. You choose one the following options for what appears:

  • One elemental of challenge rating 2 or lower
  • Two elementals of challenge rating 1 or lower
  • Four elementals of challenge rating 1/2 or lower
  • Eight elementals of challenge rating 1/4 or lower.

An elemental summoned by this spell disappears when it drops to 0 hit points or when the spell ends.
The summoned creatures are friendly to you and your companions. Roll initiative for the summoned creatures as a group, which has its own turns. They obey any verbal commands that you issue to them (no action required by you). If you don’t issue any commands to them, they defend themselves from hostile creatures, but otherwise take no actions.
The GM has the creatures’ statistics.
At Higher Levels: When you cast this spell using certain higher-level spell slots, you choose one of the summoning options above, and more creatures appear: twice as many with a 6th-level slot and three times as many with an 8th-level slot.

Between conjure animals and conjure celestial, this one more closely resembles the former. Like the druid/ranger spell, it brings a number of lower powered creatures.

This spell let’s a wizard do something similar to their nature-loving counterparts, having cannon fodder to attack in their stead. However, the kinds of creatures you can someone with this spell gives the wizard far more options. Creatures like an azer, fire snake, gargoyle, or magmin possess both a small measure of intelligence and hands. So the creatures summoned to a wizard’s side, while no more powerful than those conjured with the druidic spell, provides more options. Not only can they attack on the character’s behalf, they can build and they can provide information to the conjurer. If monsters are coming to attack, you can prepare and have additional help. If the characters are stuck, these conjured creatures can help provide answers.

If these is one problem with this spell is a lack of options. Unless you desire something of the fire or earth elements, your option is a mephit. This is an issue that we at JBE wish to see rectified. Every Wednesday, we share a monster, either a new creature or one from our adventures. Stop by every week; we will be creating creatures for you to conjure.

Support our efforts to bring you monsters. Download Deadly Delves: Along Came a Spider today from Jon Brazer Enterprises Shop. This 1st-level adventure features spiders, perfect for those with acrophobia, like myself. Also you can get the printed terrain so you do not have to draw the amazing maps featured in this adventure. Order them today from DriveThruRPG and RPGNow.

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5e: Draugr

Deadly Delves: Rescue from Tyrkaven (5e)

The way we present Fifth Edition monsters and NPCs these days is a quite standardized for us, but that was not always the case. Before there was a 5e OGL, we used the 3.5/Pathfinder’s SRD to make our 5e books. Because of that, we had Deadly Delves: Rescue from Tyrkaven available much earlier than anyone else. It also means that the monsters there, while still balanced need to be updated. While we will get to that, I thought I would share with you one of those monsters now in their updated stat block.

Let me dispel any speculation by coming clean: the draugr in this adventure were inspired by the draugr in The Elder Scrolls V: Skyrim, a game I enjoy quite a bit and still play from time to time. I wanted my zombies to be more than your standard shambling horde that will feast on your brains, eventually. I wanted fast and dangerous creatures that would make players tremble when they see their numbers and enjoy turning them into a pile of bones and rotten flesh. That is what these monsters deliver and I am glad to have created them.

Draugr

Medium undead, neutral evil


Armor Class 11
Hit Points 45 (7d8 + 14)
Speed 40 ft.


Str 14 (+2) Dex 12 (+1) Con 15 (+2)
Int 6 (–2) Wis 12 (+1) Cha 7 (–2)


Saving Throws Wis +3
Skills Perception +3, Stealth +3
Damage Immunities poison
Condition Immunities poisoned
Languages Common (cannot speak)
Senses darkvision 60 ft., passive Perception 13
Challenge 1/2 (100 XP)

Actions


Multiattack. The draugr makes two slam attacks.
Slam. Melee Weapon Attack: +4 to hit, reach 5 ft., one target. Hit: 5 (1d6 + 2) bludgeoning damage.
Scream (usable once day). As its action, a draugr can let out a terrifying scream that is also a rallying cry. All undead within 30 feet gain advantage to attack rolls. This bonus lasts for 1 minute.

Support our efforts to bring you monsters every week by download Deadly Delves: Rescue from Tyrkaven for Fifth Edition at the JBE Shop.

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5e: Conjure Celestial

Book of Beasts: Monsters of the Forbidden Woods (5e)

Last week, we took a look at the lowest level spell to conjure monsters to fight on your behalf: conjure animals. Today, we are skipping to the opposite extreme and going to the highest level spell that lets you have help from beyond (other than gate): conjure celestial.

Conjure Celestial

7th-level conjuration
Casting Time: 1 minute
Range: 90 feet
Components: V, S
Duration: Concentration, up to 1 hour
You summon a celestial of challenge rating 4 or lower, which appears in an unoccupied space that you can see within range. The celestial disappears when it drops to 0 hit points or when the spell ends.
The celestial is friendly to you and your companions for the duration. Roll initiative for the celestial, which has its own turns. It obeys any verbal commands that you issue to it (no action required by you), as long as they don’t violate its alignment. If you don’t issue any commands to the celestial, it defends itself from hostile creatures but otherwise takes no actions.
The GM has the celestial’s statistics.
At Higher Levels: When you cast this spell using a 9th-level spell slot, you summon a celestial of challenge rating 5 or lower.

First point to notice about this spell versus conjure animals is that you can only bring one creature. With conjure animals, you can bring a greater number of lower level creatures, using them as cannon fodder if need be. This spell, however, you can only call in one creature. So you are going to want to make sure it is exactly the creature you want for the situation.

The next point to note is that you are limited to creatures of challenge 4 or below (5 if you cast it as a 9th level spell). As a 7th-level spell (which you have to be 13th level to cast in the first place), you can either call upon a single celestial for 1 hour that is of a difficulty that your group was defeating 9 levels prior. At a time when you can cast plane shift, regenerate, and resurrection, this spells seems under-powered. However, this can be countered be a large number of creatures with a wide variety of abilities that you can call upon. Which brings me to the most important point concerning with this spell…

There are not that many creatures that qualify for this spell. Like I mentioned you are limited to Challenge 4 and below (5 if you don’t need to use true resurrection today). In the MM, these are all the creatures this spell can conjure: couatl (Challenge 4), pegasus (Challenge 2), and a unicorn (Challenge 5). That’s it. If there were a spell called conjure fiend for an evil cleric (which, I assume there is), that cleric would have 11 creatures to summon (16 if cast as a 9th-level spell). That is more than 5 times as many. Sure the MM is designed with things to kill in mind, but there should be more options available.

That is a large oversight that needs corrected. Follow us at JonBrazer.com as we create some celestials just for you. Every Wednesday we showcase either a new monster or one from our adventures or monster books. We are working on some monsters for your to conjure (whether for this spell or the others that we are coming here).

Support our efforts to create monsters for you. Download Book of Beasts: Monsters of the Forbidden Woods today direct from us for your Fifth Edition game here at JonBrazer.com. You can also find it at DriveThruRPG/RPGNow, Paizo, and the Open Gaming Store.

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5e: What Levels Need More Adventures?

Deadly Delves: Rescue from Tyrkaven (5e)

I’ve asked this before for Pathfinder. Now that we are trying to ramp up our 5e production, it is a solid idea to find out what levels of adventures you would like to see. I know many would like to say, “All levels,” but we do not have the resources to do adventures for levels 1 and 20 at the same time. Where do you feel we should we focus our energy. Share your thoughts with us and share this poll with your friends today.

What Level in 5e Need More Adventures?

View Results

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Download all our Deadly Delves adventures for 5e today at the JBE Shop, DriveThruRPG/RPGNow, Paizo, and the Open Gaming Store.

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5e: Conjure Animals

Last week, we started a series on the summon monster spells for Pathfinder. Summoning works differently in Fifth Edition and I thought it would be a good idea to take a few moments to discuss the spells one by one. Today, let’s start with the lowest level one: conjure animals, a third level spell for druids and rangers. This spell reads:

Conjure Animals

3rd-level conjuration
Casting Time: 1 action
Range: 60 feet
Components: V, S
Duration: Concentration, up to 1 hour
You summon fey spirits that take the form of beasts and appear in unoccupied spaces that you can see within range. Choose one of the following options for what appears:

  • One beast of challenge rating 2 or lower
  • Two beasts of challenge rating 1 or lower
  • Four beasts of challenge rating 1/2 or lower
  • Eight beasts of challenge rating 1/4 or lower

Each beast is also considered fey, and it disappears when it drops to 0 hit points or when the spell ends.
The summoned creatures are friendly to you and your companions. Roll initiative for the summoned creatures as a group, which has its own turns. They obey any verbal commands that you issue to them (no action required by you). If you don’t issue any commands to them, they defend themselves from hostile creatures, but otherwise take no actions.
The GM has the creatures’ statistics.
At Higher Levels: When you cast this spell using certain higher-level spell slots, you choose one of the summoning options above, and more creatures appear: twice as many with a 5th-level slot, three times as many with a 7th-level slot, and four times as many with a 9th-level slot.

Alright, that’s all good, but what can you conjure up. Lets start with the creatures in the PHB (ignoring anything less than CR 1/4).

  • CR 2:
  • CR 1: brown bear, dire wolf, giant eagle, giant spider, lion, tiger
  • CR 1/2: black bear, crocodile, reef shark, war horse
  • CR 1/4: boar, constrictor snake, panther, riding horse, wolf

You’ll notice there is nothing in the CR 2 range for this. That is not a mistake; there are no “beasts” in the PHB of CR 2. How about the MM (in order they appear in the book, ignoring any options in the PHB):

  • CR 2: allosaurus (dinosaur), plesiosaurus (dinosaur), giant boar, giant constrictor snake, giant elk, hunter shark, polar bear, rhinoceros, saber-toothed tiger
  • CR 1: giant hyena, giant octopus, giant toad, giant vulture
  • CR 1/2: ape, giant goat, giant sea horse, giant wasp, reef shark
  • CR 1/4: pteranodon (dinosaur), axe beak, draft horse, elk, giant badger, giant bat, giant centipede, giant frog, giant lizard, giant owl, giant poisonous snake, giant wolf spider

Total: CR 2 has nine creatures to conjure, CR 1 has ten, CR 1/2 has nine and CR 1/4 blows the rest away with seventeen.

Personally, I feel that for the first conjuring spell, there should be more options at the highest power level. Once I am done going through the conjure spells, I will be creating more creatures for you to summon.

When you conjure up a creature, make sure you are first playing an awesome race. Go beyond the ordinary and download Book of Heroic Races: Player Races 2 today at the Jon Brazer Enterprises Shop. Also find it at DriveThruRPG/RPGNow, Paizo, and the Open Gaming Store.

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5e Adventures for Conventions

Deadly Delves: Rescue from Tyrkaven (5e)

If you are running a Fifth Edition game at a convention this fall, you could run an adventure from the official living game that is designed for the players to “win” or you could run an adventure built for fun with intrigue in mind, like ours are. Three of our Deadly Delve adventures are both short enough for a convention game and provide a different experience than anything in the official living campaign does.

Deadly Delves: Along Came a Spider – Level 1

Giant spiders have overrun Mossdale, and every last villager is either dead and dessicated, or cocooned and abducted. But what were they after, and who coordinated the vermin to attack en masse? Could it have been the local ettercap or a crazed arachnophile druid… or was something far more sinister behind the attack? Can the adventurers rescue the missing citizens and foil the plans of the nefarious mind behind this dastardly deed before it is too late?

Deadly Delves: Doom of the Sky Sword – Level 1

Following the disappearance of personnel at a lumber camp, a mysterious sword drops from the sky, cleaving the very earth to deliver a pronouncement of doom upon all who refuse to leave the logging site. Can the adventurers ferret out the source of this ominous portent and put a stop to it before it wreaks further havoc on the loggers?

Deadly Delves: Rescue from Tyrkaven – Level 2

When hobgoblin raiders kidnap a caravan full of workers and supplies, the adventurers set off to get them all back. But neither the raiders nor the adventurers know what terrifying horrors await them in the depths of their cavern hideout. Now, the adventurers must risk it all to prevent the minions of an ancient enemy from visiting death and destruction upon the land. Can the heroes rescue the captives from the hobgoblins and deliver them from this ancient foe—or will they all perish, ushering in the rise of a forgotten deity?

Check out all of our Fifth Edition products at the Jon Brazer Enterprises Shop, DriveThruRPG/RPGNow, Paizo, and the Open Gaming Store.